The Elephants KnewSome will say there is no God,try and tell that to the elephants…..THE ELEPHANTS’ JOURNEY TO PAY RESPECT,BUT HOW DID THEY KNOW?Lawrence Anthony, a legend in South Africa and author of 3 books including the bestseller, The Elephant Whisperer.He bravely rescued wildlife and rehabilitated elephants all over the globe from human atrocities, including the courageousrescue of Baghdad Zoo animals during US invasion in 2003.On March 7, 2012 Lawrence Anthony died. He is remembered and missed by his wife, 2 sons, 2 grandsons, and numerous elephants. Two days after his passing, the wild elephants showed up at his home led by two large matriarchs. Separate wild herds arrived in droves to say goodbye to their beloved ‘man-friend’. A total of 31 elephants had patiently walked over 12 milesto get to his South African House.Witnessing this spectacle, humans were obviously in awe not only because of the supreme intelligence and precise timing that these elephants sensed about Lawrence’s passing, but also because of the profound memory and emotion the beloved animals evoked in such an organized way: Walking slowly, for days, making their way in a solemn one-by-one queue from their habitat to his house. Lawrence ‘s wife, Francoise, was especially touched, knowing that the elephants had not been to his house prior to that day for well over 3 years! But yet they knew where they were going. The elephants obviously wanted to pay their deep respects, honoring their friend who’d saved their lives - so much respect that they stayed for 2 days 2 nights without eating anything. Then one morning, they left, making their long journey back home.SOMETHING IN THE UNIVERSE IS GREATERAND DEEPER THAN HUMAN INTELLIGENCE.IN GOD WE TRUST

The Elephants Knew

Some will say there is no God,
try and tell that to the elephants…..

THE ELEPHANTS’ JOURNEY TO PAY RESPECT,
BUT HOW DID THEY KNOW?

Lawrence Anthony, a legend in South Africa and author of 3 books including the bestseller, The Elephant Whisperer.
He bravely rescued wildlife and rehabilitated elephants all over the globe from human atrocities, including the courageousrescue of Baghdad Zoo animals during US invasion in 2003.

On March 7, 2012 Lawrence Anthony died. He is remembered and missed by his wife, 2 sons, 2 grandsons, and numerous elephants. Two days after his passing, the wild elephants showed up at his home led by two large matriarchs. Separate wild herds arrived in droves to say goodbye to their beloved ‘man-friend’. A total of 31 elephants had patiently walked over 12 milesto get to his South African House.

Witnessing this spectacle, humans were obviously in awe not only because of the supreme intelligence and precise timing that these elephants sensed about Lawrence’s passing, but also because of the profound memory and emotion the beloved animals evoked in such an organized way: Walking slowly, for days, making their way in a solemn one-by-one queue from their habitat to his house. Lawrence ‘s wife, Francoise, was especially touched, knowing that the elephants had not been to his house prior to that day for well over 3 years! But yet they knew where they were going. The elephants obviously wanted to pay their deep respects, honoring their friend who’d saved their lives - so much respect that they stayed for 2 days 2 nights without eating anything. Then one morning, they left, making their long journey back home.

SOMETHING IN THE UNIVERSE IS GREATER
AND DEEPER THAN HUMAN INTELLIGENCE.

IN GOD WE TRUST

vicemag
vicemag:

The Lost Boys of California Are Literally Dying to Pick Your Fruit
t the age when most American teenagers are trying to decide whom to ask to prom, Ernesto Valenzuela was instead weighing whether it was worse to die of thirst in the desert or have his throat slit by gangsters.
That’s the choice the 16-year-old faced in his hometown of Mapulaca, Honduras, a drowsy village where MS-13 and Barrio 18 gangsters are known for recruiting youth—sometimes as young as kindergartners—into their cartels. If the kids refuse, they are often killed. Now Ernesto was being recruited, and he didn’t want to end up one of the 6,000 people murdered each year in Honduras. With a total population just shy of 8 million, that means nearly one of every 1,000 Hondurans is a victim of homicide, making it the most dangerous place—after the war zones of Iraq, Somalia, and Syria—in the world.1
After mulling it over for months—and trying to dodge the tattooed gang members who wanted to sign him up—Ernesto decided his potential fate at home presented far more danger than what he might face at any distant desert crossing. So, early one morning in June 2013, after his mother sobbed and begged him to stay safe, he set out for a place he’d only seen in movies, a place where he’d heard a kid like himself—with just a fifth-grade education—could earn $60 a day working in the fields: America.
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vicemag:

The Lost Boys of California Are Literally Dying to Pick Your Fruit

t the age when most American teenagers are trying to decide whom to ask to prom, Ernesto Valenzuela was instead weighing whether it was worse to die of thirst in the desert or have his throat slit by gangsters.

That’s the choice the 16-year-old faced in his hometown of Mapulaca, Honduras, a drowsy village where MS-13 and Barrio 18 gangsters are known for recruiting youth—sometimes as young as kindergartners—into their cartels. If the kids refuse, they are often killed. Now Ernesto was being recruited, and he didn’t want to end up one of the 6,000 people murdered each year in Honduras. With a total population just shy of 8 million, that means nearly one of every 1,000 Hondurans is a victim of homicide, making it the most dangerous place—after the war zones of Iraq, Somalia, and Syria—in the world.1

After mulling it over for months—and trying to dodge the tattooed gang members who wanted to sign him up—Ernesto decided his potential fate at home presented far more danger than what he might face at any distant desert crossing. So, early one morning in June 2013, after his mother sobbed and begged him to stay safe, he set out for a place he’d only seen in movies, a place where he’d heard a kid like himself—with just a fifth-grade education—could earn $60 a day working in the fields: America.

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mumsl

mumsl:

http://www.mum.edu/sustainable-living 

For their October Natural Building class, a group of 12 MUM Sustainable Living students traveled to the Texas desert, where they spent 11 days constructing a 14 x 14ft. adobe house made primarily from local materials.
Working with their instructor, MUM Sustainable Living Workshop Director Mark Stimson, the students began their work on campus, creating a plan and estimating the amount of materials they would need. For the post-and-beam frame, they harvested and trimmed dead spruce trees on campus. They also prepared and canned all their food in advance. 
Another major project before they left: learning metalwork so they could make machetes for harvesting the river cane they would need for thatching the roof.
The desert site is just north of Big Bend National Park, 80 miles from the nearest town on a road too rugged for ordinary cars. 
They traveled from the MUM campus in Fairfield, Iowa, via the Sustainable Living Department bus, which is powered by biodiesel fuel that was made by the students and staff member Steve Fugate.
Once on site, the students learned to sift the soil used for the bricks, moisten it with water, and then use forms to create the bricks. Once skilled, they were able to make a brick in less than a minute. But then the 850 bricks — all 17,000 lbs. of them — had to be carried up a long hill. The students formed a chain, and accomplished the task with aplomb.
Then they harvested local giant river cane (Arundo donax) with the machetes they’d made. Tied into bundles, the river cane served as a waterproof thatched roof. The finished adobe house will be used as a bunkhouse and field research station.

MUM’s block system — one full-time course per month — makes it easy for students to undertake intense projects like this, along with internships and other classes that involve travel.

In addition to learning practical construction skills, the students had the opportunity to experience an extraordinary landscape that includes deep vertical canyons, distant mountains, and rock-outcroppings dating back 500 million years, fossils, petrified wood, and a hot spring on the Rio Grande River. 

"It was a transformative experience," Mr. Stimson said. "They’ve never seen anything like this desert, with its vast scale. The heights and distances reset your perspective on things."

"The students were confronted with many challenges in this remote desert region," said Stimson, "but in the process they learned a lot about teamwork, leadership, self-sufficiency, and how to be flexible in the changing conditions they encountered."

Sustainable Living Co-director Lonnie Gamble says: “We’re learning how to use local natural materials….More broadly, we’re also learning about how we can work with Nature, how we can connect with Nature….At MUM, we also have an inner connection with Nature through Transcendental Meditation.”

For more videos about MUM’s unique system of Consciousness-Based education, visit our Video Café: http://www.mum.edu/video-cafe

Maharishi University of Management (MUM) offers undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the arts, sciences, business, and humanities. The University is accredited through the doctoral level by the Higher Learning Commission.

Founded in 1971 by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the University features Consciousness-Based education to develop students’ inner potential. All students and faculty practice the Transcendental Meditation technique, which extensive published research has found boosts learning ability, improves brain functioning, and reduces stress.

Maharishi University uses the block system in which each student takes one course at a time. Students report they learn more without the stress of taking 4-5 courses at once.

The University has a strong focus on sustainability and natural health, and serves organic vegetarian meals. The B.S. in Sustainable Living is MUM’s most popular undergraduate major.

Maharishi University of Management http://www.mum.edu
Consciousness-Based education http://www.mum.edu/cbe/
Transcendental Meditation http://www.mum.edu/tm.html
Research http://www.mum.edu/tm_resea……
Block system http://www.mum.edu/cbe/bloc
Sustainability http://www.mum.edu/sustaina
Natural health http://www.mum.edu/cbe/natu……
Organic veg meals http://www.mum.edu/campus/d
BS Sustainable Living http://www.mum.edu/sustaina

beingblog

beingblog:

"When you live in a city like Detroit, it’s not just buildings that have become ruins. It’s that a way of life, a way of thinking has died and something else has been born — a new culture, a new spirit. And I think that’s what you get in Detroit if you are able to look past the ruins. What an opportunity. What a time to be alive."

Here’s a different story about Detroit. With the recent news coverage of its declaration of bankruptcy, we travel to a city of vigor where joyful, passionate people are reimagining work, food, and the very meaning of humanity. Grace Lee Boggs, a Chinese-American philosopher and civil rights legend, is the heart and soul of this largely hidden story, which holds lessons for us all.